Investigator Profiles

Site Directors

Curriculum Vitae

USC Profile

Eileen Crimmins

AARP Professor of Gerontology & University Professor, University of Southern California.

Network co-PI Eileen Crimmins, is the AARP Professor of Gerontology at the Davis School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California. She is a demographer whose research has focused on trends and differentials in mortality, health, and healthy life expectancy. In recent years, she has been a leader in documenting the extent of U.S. health deterioration relative to other high income countries. She has also linked relative deterioration in mortality for U.S. women to a relative deterioration in biological risk profiles for which sex differentials have changed significantly in recent years. Crimmins is a co-investigator of the HRS study. With Teresa Seeman, an epidemiologist at UCLA, she co-directs an NIA supported Center on Biodemography and Population Health and an NIA supported Network on the Measurement of Biological Risk in Populations which has helped to integrate Biology into social science studies over the past two decades through annual meetings held in conjunction with PAA. In the last few years, Crimmins and Seeman have also hosted (with NIA support) meetings on data harmonization across multiple U.S. and international surveys and stress conceptualization and measurement. These activities seek to improve the scientific community's ability to use existing population data to understand sources of health differentials and change and are central to our Network. Crimmins has co-authored papers with many network members.

Curriculum Vitae

UT Profile

Mark Hayward

Professor of Sociology; Centennial Commission Professor in the Liberal Arts; Faculty Research Associate, Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin.

Dr. Hayward's primary research addresses how life course exposures and events influence the morbidity and mortality experiences of the adult population. Recent studies have clarified how early life conditions influence socioeconomic, race and gender disparities in adult morbidity and mortality; the demography of race/ethnic and gender disparities in healthy life expectancy; social inequality in the biomarkers of aging, and the health consequences of marriage, divorce, and widowhood. Most recently, he has been investigating the fundamental inequalities in adult mortality in the United States arising from educational experience, differences in these associations by race and gender, and the growing educational inequality in mortality.

Curriculum Vitae

SRC Profile

James S. House

Angus Campbell Distinguished University Professor of Sociology, Survey Research & Public Policy, Professor of Sociology, College of LSA, & Professor of Public Policy, Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan.

James S. House, contact co-PI of the network and PI of the UM site, is the PI of the ACL and CCAHS studies, and has engaged in collaborative work with PSID and HRS. Over his career he has made major contributions to the study of occupational stress and health, social relationships and supports in relation to health, and SES disparities in health over the life course. His current work focuses on understanding the nature and sources of social disparities (mainly by SES, but also race/ethnicity and gender) in mortality and functional health in the ACL and CCAHS studies, and increasingly also their role in patterns of population health and spending for health care, both in the U.S. and in comparison to other nations. These interests are integral to those of the proposed network.

Curriculum Vitae

UNC Profile

Robert Hummer

Howard W. Odum Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Fellow, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Robert Hummer is a sociologist and demographer whose research centers on health and mortality disparities in the United States. He has published more than 130 journal articles and book chapters related to health and mortality patterns in the United States and his work has been funded by a number of federal agencies and private foundations. In 2010, he was given the Clifford Clogg Award by the Population Association of America for Early Career Achievement. Earlier, his book with Richard Rogers and Charles Nam, Living and Dying in the USA: Health, Behavioral, and Social Differentials of Adult Mortality (Academic Press, 2000), won the Otis Dudley Duncan Award from the Population Section of the American Sociological Association for its contribution to the field of social demography. He is currently collaborating with Kathleen Mullan Harris and other colleagues at the Carolina Population Center to collect Wave V of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), which is funded by NICHD, and is slated to become Director of Add Health for Wave VI. He is also currently Co-PI of an NIA-funded grant (with Eileen Crimmins, James House, and Mark Hayward) that is developing a research network to understand how and why the United States is falling behind most other developed/wealthy nations, and even some developing nations, on major indicators of population health. He also is working on an NICHD-funded project (with Richard Rogers) that aims to better understand socioeconomic, family structure, and race/ethnic disparities in early life (ages 0-24) mortality in the United States, with substantial attention given to geographic differences and temporal changes in those disparities. Finally, he is the Co-PI and Co-Director (with Allison Aiello) of a T32 Training Grant from NICHD on Biosocial Training in Life Course Health Research. Over the course of his career, he is most proud of chairing or co-chairing 29 completed dissertations (to date). His former students have gone on to leading positions in academia, both in the United States and internationally, as well as in academic administration and the federal government. His classroom teaching interests mirror his research interests and focus on demography, population health, and aging and the life course.

Advisory Committee

Curriculum Vitae

Harvard Profile

Lisa Berkman

Thomas D. Cabot Professor of Public Policy and of Epidemiology Director, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Harvard University.

Dr. Berkman is an internationally-recognized social epidemiologist whose work focuses extensively on social and policy influences on health outcomes. Her research has been oriented towards understanding inequalities in health related to socioeconomic status, different racial and ethnic groups, and social networks, support and isolation. The majority of her work is devoted to identifying the role of social networks and support in predicting declines in physical and cognitive functioning, onset of disease and mortality, especially related to cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disease. In addition, she has devoted much of her work to understanding determinants of population health by comparing European countries with the U. S. She is currently a member of the Conseil Scientifique de l'Institut de Recherche en Sante Publique (IReSP) in France and a member of IOM. She has been actively involved since 1994 on the GAZEL study, a cohort of 20,000 French employees of EDF-GDF, the large natural gas-electricity company, and also with a study involving workplace practices and employee and family health.

Curriculum Vitae

RAND Profile

James P. Smith

Distinguished Chair in Labor Markets and Demographic Studies, RAND Corporation.

James P. Smith holds the Distinguished Chair in Labor Markets and Demographic Studies at the RAND Corporation. He has studied immigration, the economics of aging, black-white wages and employment, the effects of economic development on labor markets, wealth accumulation and savings behavior, the interrelation of health and economic status, and the effects of attrition and nonresponse in the National Institute on Aging's Health and Retirement Study (HRS). He is principal investigator for the New Immigrant Survey, which yields adequate sample size of the foreign-born, has known sampling properties, permits longitudinal analyses, and can answer policy questions of relevance to immigration.

Smith chaired the Panel on Demographic and Economic Impacts of Immigration (1995–1997), the Committee on Population, and the Committee on National Statistics, National Academy of Sciences. He has been an invited speaker before the President's Initiative on Race in Phoenix, the Federal Reserve Board of Los Angeles, and the Prime Minister and members of Parliament of New Zealand, among many others. Smith has twice received the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Merit Award, the most distinguished honor NIH grants to a researcher. In 2013, Smith received an honorary degree of Doctor of the University from the University of Stirling, Scotland; in 2011, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine; and in 2009, he received the Ulysses Medal from University College Dublin. Smith received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago.

Curriculum Vitae

Harvard Profile

David R. Williams

Florence Sprague Norman and Laura Smart Norman Professor of Public Health, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Harvard University.

David R. Williams is the Florence Sprague Norman and Laura Smart Norman Professor of Public Health at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Professor of African and African American Studies and of Sociology at Harvard University. His first 6 years as a faculty member were at Yale University where he held appointments in both Sociology and Public Health. The next 14 years were at the University of Michigan where he was the Harold Cruse Collegiate Professor of Sociology, a Senior Research Scientist at the Institute of Social Research and a Professor of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health. Dr. Williams holds an MPH degree from Loma Linda University and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Michigan.

He is internationally recognized as a leading social scientist focused on social influences on health. His research has enhanced our understanding of the complex ways in which race, racism, socioeconomic status, stress, health behaviors and religious involvement can affect physical and mental health. The Everyday Discrimination scale that he developed is currently one of the most widely used measures to assess perceived discrimination in health studies. He is the author of more than 325 scholarly papers in scientific journals and edited collections and his research has appeared in leading journals in sociology, psychology, medicine, public health and epidemiology. He has served on the editorial board of 12 scientific journals and as a reviewer for over 60 journals. According to ISI Essential Science Indicators, he was one of the Top 10 Most Cited Researchers in the Social Sciences during the decade 1995 to 2005. The Journal of Black Issues in Higher Education, ranked him as the Most Cited Black Scholar in the Social Sciences in 2008. In 2001, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences and in 2007 to membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2004, he received one of the inaugural Decade of Behavior Research Awards, in 2011, he was the first non-white scholar to receive the Leo G. Reeder Award from the American Sociological Association and in 2013, he received the Stephen Smith Award for Distinguished Contributions in Public Health from the New York Academy of Medicine.

Curriculum Vitae

VCU Profile

Steven H. Woolf

Professor, Department of Family Medicine and Population Health, Virginia Commonwealth University.

Steven Woolf has served as Director of the VCU Center on Society and Health since he established it in 2007. He is also Professor of Family Medicine and Population Health at VCU. He has published more than 180 articles in a career that has focused on evidence-based medicine and the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, with a special focus on preventive medicine, cancer screening, quality improvement, and social justice. His studies demonstrate that addressing poverty, education, and the causes of racial and ethnic disparities could accomplish far more to improve the health of Americans than investing predominantly in medical technological advances. In addition to scientific publications, he has tried to bring this message to policymakers and to the public through testimony in Congress, editorials in major newspapers, web-based tools, and speeches.

Network Members

Curriculum Vitae

UNC Profile

ARG Website

Allison E. Aiello

Professor & Social Epidemiology Program Leader, Department of Epidemiology; Fellow, Carolina Population Center. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dr. Aiello is Professor of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health and Adjunct Professor of Social Medicine at University of North Carolina School of Medicine. She leads the Social Epidemiology Program in the department of Epidemiology, Directs the Integrating Special Populations Program of the North Carolina Translation and Clinical Sciences Institute, and Co-Directs the Interdisciplinary Training in Life Course Research Program at the Carolina Population Center. Dr. Aiello is a fellow at the Carolina Population Center and an alum of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health and Society Scholars Program. Dr. Aiello’s multidisciplinary and collaborative research has applied approaches from epidemiology, genomics, sociology, and immunology to address complex health questions related to social determinants, infection and chronic disease.

Curriculum Vitae

USC Profile

Personal Website

Jennifer Ailshire

Assistant Professor, Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California.

Dr. Ailshire's research addresses questions that lie at the intersections of social stratification, urban sociology, and the sociology of health and aging. In particular, her research focuses on the importance of the neighborhood environment and social relationships in determining health over the life course. A consistent theme throughout her work is an interest in gender, socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic inequality in health. Current projects include research on social factors associated with poor sleep; neighborhood determinants of racial and ethnic disparities in obesity; socioenvironmental influences on disability, social participation, and cognitive function in older adults; unequal exposure to particulate air pollution and consequences for cognitive function, inflammation, and lung function; and the social, psychosocial, and health correlates of exceptional longevity among U.S. adults.

Curriculum Vitae

UT Profile

Jacqueline L. Angel

Professor, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and the Department of Sociology; Faculty Research Associate of the Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin.

Professor Jacqueline Angel has published extensively in the area of aging and the life course and she has served as an advisor to non-governmental organizations and other agencies that provide basic services to the elderly. Her work focuses on the impact of social policy on the well-being of aging Latinos and other vulnerable groups. She has served on several governmental and professional committees and is currently developing a long-term research agenda that focuses on the role of civil society and non-governmental organizations on the care of low-income elderly in the United States and Latin America.

Curriculum Vitae

UT Profile

Ronald J. Angel

Professor, Department of Sociology; Faculty Research Associate of the Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin.

Ronald Angel has extensive experience in comparative research involving Latinos in the United States and Latin America. He is a fluent Spanish speaker and has been involved in the development and translation of major survey protocols. He was a demography trainee at the University of Wisconsin, Madison as a graduate student and has extensive training in demography and survey research. He is an expert in issues of instrument development for comparative research. In addition to quantitative research he is interested in triangulation and the combination of qualitative and quantitative research techniques. In addition to his methodological skills Angel is an expert in health policy, again with a specific focus on impoverished and minority populations. His research also focuses on comparative health care systems and the role of health care funding on differentials in access among different groups. He has published extensively on health care access issues among minority Americans with specific attention to Latinos. In addition to serving on numerous editorial boards he was Editor of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior from 1994 to 1997. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In addition to serving on Masters and PhD committees at Rutgers, Angel has served on 71 Masters and Doctoral committees at Texas. He has served as Chair on 25 of those.

Curriculum Vitae

AU Profile

Personal Website

Michael Bader

Assistant Professor of Sociology at American University.

Michael Bader studies how cities and neighborhoods have evolved since the height of the Civil Rights Movement. He links long-term patterns of neighborhood racial change to the ways that race and class influence the housing search process. He studies how these changes affect the health and well being of Americans and potentially exacerbate racial health inequality. In particular, he is focusing on how neighborhood changes could lead to racially unequal outcome for older adults who "age in place." To accomplish this research Dr. Bader has developed methodological tools that combine survey data with "big data" to study neighborhood environments.More information can be found on his website, http://mikebader.net.

Curriculum Vitae

Duke Profile

Daniel Belsky

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Department of Population Health Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine.

Dan is Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Department of Population Health Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine, Assistant Research Professor at the Duke Social Science Research Institute, and Early Career Fellow of the Jacobs Foundation. Dan works at the intersection of population sciences and public health, biomedicine, and genomics. His research seeks to understand causes of socioeconomic disparities in health in the aging process with the aim of devising novel approaches to intervention, in particular efforts to promote successful development early in life and slow deterioration in aging. Find out more here.

Curriculum Vitae

RAND Profile

Chloe Bird

Senior Sociologist; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School, Editor-in-chief of the journal Women's Health Issues.

Dr. Bird's research focuses on women's health and determinants of gender, racial/ ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in health and health care. She has served as PI or co-PI on multiple NIH-funded studies of neighborhood effects on health and healthcare and on social determinants of gender differences in health, allostatic load and mortality. She also has 15 years of experience conducting assessments of gaps in quality of care for cardiovascular disease and diabetes within managed care settings for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), Veterans Affairs (VA) and private sector health plans. She is currently leading research assessing and mapping gender differences in the quality of care for cardiovascular disease and diabetes and co-investigator on RAND analyses of patterns of quality of care within Medicare Advantage plans nationally. In her book, Gender and Health: The Effects of Constrained Choice and Social Policies, she and co-author Patricia Rieker integrate social and biological models to improve understanding of how differences in men's and women's lives and where they live contribute to differences in their health. This work expands the study of health and health disparities by shedding light on the how decision makers including employers and policy makers shape individuals' opportunities to purse a healthy life, and emphasizes the need for research to inform health decision making beyond those made by individuals and their clinicians.

Curriculum Vitae

UC Profile

Personal Website

Jason Boardman

Professor, Department of Sociology and Director of the Health & Society Program in the Institute of Behavioral Science at the University of Colorado in Boulder.

Boardman is an expert in social and genetic epidemiology with a focus on the link between genotype and health related phenotypes as moderated by social contexts such as neighborhoods and schools. With support from a K01 award through NIH/NICHD, he studied behavioral and molecular genetics at the Institute for Behavioral Genetics at the University of Colorado at Boulder from 2006-2010 and has served as the MPI (with Matt McQueen) of an R01 (NIH/NICHD R01HD060726) in which they genotyped the respondents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. His work in this area has appeared in leading sociological (Journal of Health & Social Behavior), public health (American Journal of Public Health), demographic (Demography), genetics (Nature Genetics) and general science (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) journals. Together with Jason Fletcher (University of Wisconsin), Boardman has directed the annual Integrating Genetics and the Social Sciences (IGSS) conference at CU Boulder for the past nine years.

Curriculum Vitae

Duke Profile

Tyson H. Brown

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Center for Biobehavioral Health Disparities Research, Duke University.

Dr. Brown's research examines how and why racial/ethnic stratification and other axes of inequality combine to shape health and wealth across the life course. This research interest is expressed in three foci: 1) using multidimensional approaches to stratification to investigate the intersecting consequences of social factors on health and wealth, 2) examining whether inequality increases or decreases over the life course, and 3) determining the extent to which various structural and psychosocial mechanisms underlie within- and between-group differences in health. Brown's training and research have been supported by funding from the National Institute on Aging and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Curriculum Vitae

PSC Profile

Personal Website

Sarah Burgard

Research Associate Professor, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan. Co-Director, Postdoctoral Program, Population Studies Center, University of Michigan. Associate Professor, Sociology, University of Michigan. Associate Professor, Epidemiology, University of Michigan.

My research focuses on health disparities by socioeconomic status, gender, and race/ethnicity across the life course. I have focused particularly on the links between employment and health, including mental health, chronic disease and overall health status, and health behaviors. I am a PI of the Michigan Recession and Recovery Study, a panel survey of adults in Southeast Michigan that is tracking the health and mental health of these individuals in the wake of the Great Recession of 2007-2009. I am also the current PI of the Americans' Changing Lives Study, a panel representing the U.S. adult population that was started in 1986. Using these data, I have published on the reciprocal associations between employment insecurity and instability and health, and as well as on the influences of financial shocks, debt, housing instability, and material hardship. I have also conducted a variety of cross-national studies on health, comparing the U.S. with Brazil, South Africa, China, and other societies that vary in theoretically and substantively important ways that impact health.

Publications

UTA Profile

Ryon J. Cobb

Assistant Professor of Social Work, University of Texas at Arlington.

Ryon J. Cobb is a sociologist by training whose research elucidates how stress exposure combines with one’s racial identification to influence the health of adults in the United States. His research has appeared or is forthcoming in peer-reviewed outlets such as the Journals of Gerontology: Medical Sciences, Social Psychology Quarterly, Ethnicity and Health, Race and Social Problems, and Biodemography and Social Biology. Several centers/institutes within and outside the National Institutes of Health have invested in his work, including the Louisville Institute, National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, and the National Institute on Aging.

Curriculum Vitae

UT Profile

Catherine Cubbin

Professor & Associate Dean for Research, School of Social Work; Faculty Research Associate of the Population Research Center; Faculty Associate of the Center for Women's and Gender Studies, University of Texas at Austin; Faculty Expert, Institute for Urban Policy Research & Analysis, University of Texas at Austin; and Full Member, LIVESTRONG Cancer Institutes, Dell Medical School.

Dr. Cubbin's research focuses on using epidemiological methods to better understand socioeconomic and racial/ethnic inequalities in health for the purpose of informing policy. Specific areas of her research include using contextual analysis to investigate how neighborhood environments may explain social inequalities in health, and the measurement of socioeconomic status/position in studies of racial/ethnic disparities in health. Using national and statewide representative data sets, she has studied social inequalities in injuries, cardiovascular disease, health behaviors, mortality, and maternal, infant, and adolescent health. She has published widely in public health and medical journals, including the American Journal of Public Health, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Curriculum Vitae

Stanford Profile

Ben Domingue

Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University.

Ben Domingue is an assistant professor in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. He is interested in how student outcomes are leveraged to inform our understanding of student learning, teacher performance, and the efficacy of other programs. He has a particular interest in the technical issues that make it challenging to draw simple inferences from such student outcomes. While not analyzing item response data, he may be found thinking about the implications for social science of the sudden increase in our capacity to measure human DNA and the promise and pitfalls associated with how this new data may change our understanding of human behavior.

Curriculum Vitae

KCL Profile

Personal Website

Jennifer Beam Dowd

Faculty of Social Science and Public Policy, School of Global Affairs, King's College London.

Dr. Jennifer Dowd is currently Reader (Associate Professor) in Global Ageing in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, King's College London and Research Associate Professor, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CUNY School of Public Health. Dr. Dowd received her Ph.D. from Princeton University with a focus on Economics and Demography from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and the Office of Population Research, followed by a position as a Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar at the Center for Social Epidemiology and Population Health at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the interplay of social and biological factors over the life course, in particular how stress and immune function may link social factors to later life health outcomes. Her current projects examine the social determinants of the microbiome at the population level, trends in the education-mortality gradient over time, and the impact of long-term obesity on population aging and longevity.

Publications

UPenn PSC Profile

Irma T. Elo

Professor of Sociology; Director of the Population Aging Research Center; Research Associate of the Population Studies Center, University of Pennsylvania.

Dr. Elo is a demographer whose research focuses on racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in health and mortality across the life course. Her research on early life influences of health and mortality at older ages has extended to both developed and less developed countries, including China, Finland and Mexico. Her contributions related to socioeconomic (SES) differentials in health and mortality include cross-national comparisons in all cause and cause-specific mortality and SES trends in mortality over time. More recently she has extended this work to examine the role of children's SES and health and mortality of their parents. Her research on racial/ethnic disparities in health and mortality across the life course in the United States has led her to investigate health and mortality among the foreign-born U.S. population with a focus on black and Hispanic immigrants, including birth outcomes, child health and old age mortality. One important change resulting from the new immigration patterns is the increasing proportion of immigrants from less developed countries, including Africa. Yet relatively little is known about the health outcomes of black immigrants or why the health of the foreign-born blacks is far superior to that of native-born blacks despite the fact they come from countries with low levels of life expectancy and heavy burden of infectious diseases. She also continues to investigate racial/ethnic disparities in birth outcomes, cause-specific contributions to black-white differences in mortality at middle and older ages, changes in these contributions over time, and the effects of data quality on estimates of mortality at the oldest ages, especially among racial/ethnic minorities in the U.S. Her most recent work examines factors that have contributed to the stagnation of US mortality decline.

Curriculum Vitae

UW Profile

Michal Engelman

Associate Professor of Sociology; Faculty Research Associate, Center for Demography and Ecology and Center for the Demography of Health and Aging, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Michal Engelman is a demographer and gerontologist studying the dynamics of population aging and the determinants of longevity and well-being at older ages. Her work examines trajectories of health throughout the life course and their connection with changing aggregate patterns of mortality and morbidity over time. Her research combines three main lines of inquiry: (1) the formal demography of longevity; (2) health across the life course; and (3) global aging, migration, and health. With support from the network, she is currently studying the impact of employment histories on racial disparities in later-life health.

UT Profile

Michele Forman

Bruton Professor of Nutritional Sciences; Faculty Research Associate of the Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin.

Dr. Forman has a 38 year career in field epidemiology research across the globe with an emphasis on early life exposures and risk for cancer as well as the role of nutrition in growth and health across the life course. She plans to engage scientists across the UT in core areas of the main NCS once the primary study begins. She is the PI on a study of the effects of preeclampsia on pubertal and nutritional development in Stavanger, Norway that is directed at the question why preeclampsia is associated with lower risk for breast cancer in the mother and female offspring and lower risk for prostate and testicular cancers in the sons of the index pregnancy. Most of her research is designed as a longitudinal prospective cohort study that spans the peri-conceptional period through adulthood. She also plans to develop a nutrition, public health and population science training program in collaboration with members of the Population Center and the College of Natural Sciences at UT Austin. She fosters the application of an animal to human paradigm within the genre of translational research to utilize animal models for hypothesis testing across the life course, for identification of molecular pathways that will inform preventive strategies, and more rapid application of findings from animal to human interventions.

Curriculum Vitae

SRC Profile

Vicki Freedman

Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.

Dr. Freedman has published extensively on the topics of population aging, disability, and long-term care. She currently serves as Co-Principal Investigator of two national panel studies: the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS) and the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). She is also leading a supplemental study of disability, time use and well-being among older adults in the PSID.

Publications

RAND Profile

Esther M. Friedman

Associate Behavioral and Social Scientist; Professor, Pardee RAND Graduate School.

Esther Friedman is a sociologist at the RAND Corporation and a professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. Her research is motivated by an interest in how disparities in health, wealth, and aging come about. She is particularly interested in the role of family -- both childhood family environments and later life family characteristics and relationships -- in shaping trajectories of healthy aging. Friedman's recent work has used data from multiple generations of the family to investigate the relationship between offspring's schooling and their parents' later life outcomes, including health, care, and wealth. Other ongoing work examines the factors that predict which children will care for older parents, how siblings coordinate care for their elderly parents, and the consequences of childhood circumstances for lifetime trajectories of health and aging.

Curriculum Vitae

VU Profile

Lauren Gaydosh

Assistant Professor of Medicine, Health, and Society, and Public Policy Studies, Vanderbilt University.

Dr. Gaydosh is a demographer and sociologist studying population health disparities. Her research focuses the role of stressful social experiences and environments in shaping health across the life course. Dr. Gaydosh integrates social, contextual, and biological data from population-based longitudinal studies to examine how inequalities in the social environment influence physiological functioning and create health disparities. Recent work includes examining the adult health consequences of childhood family instability, life course socioeconomic status and adult health, and sociodemographic patterns in indicators of despair. Her current research on the role of inflammation and immune function in race/ethnic differences in the returns to education is supported by the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD).

Curriculum Vitae

Princeton Profile

Noreen Goldman

Hughes-Rogers Professor of Demography and Public Affairs & Faculty Associate of the Office of Population Research, Princeton University.

A specialist in demography and epidemiology, Goldman's current research examines the role of the social environment and immigration on health. She has designed several large-scale surveys, including one in Guatemala focused on the determinants of illness and health care choices for women and children in rural areas, and a national data collection effort in Taiwan, designed to examine the linkages among the social environment, stress, physiological function, and health among older persons. She is currently conducting research on Latino health, exploring relationships between immigration patterns, occupational histories, physical functioning and survival, as well as research on lower birthweight among African Americans across generations. For the 2018-2019 academic year, she is a research scholar at the Russell Sage Foundation and Vice-President (elect) of the Population Association of America. She is serving on the editorial board of Demography and is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research. She has been a member of the Board of Directors of the Guttmacher Institute, a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, a member of numerous committees of the IOM, NAS, and NIH, including the Board on Global Health, the Committee on National Statistics, and the NICHD Population Research Subcommittee. She has also served in various capacities of the Population Association of America and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population.

Curriculum Vitae

UC Merced Profile

Sidra Goldman-Mellor

Assistant Professor of Public Health, School of Social Sciences, Humanities & Arts, University of California, Merced.

Sidra Goldman-Mellor, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Public Health at the University of California, Merced. She is trained as a psychiatric epidemiologist, and conducts research leveraging population-based data sources (e.g., hospital data, cohort data, complex survey data) to investigate the social determinants of mental health problems, especially suicidal behavior. She is also interested in the consequences of depression and suicidal behavior for adverse health and social outcomes. Dr. Goldman-Mellor's current NIH-funded work examines long-term health and healthcare utilization outcomes among adolescents and adults who have attempted suicide, using statewide emergency department data. She received her Ph.D. in Epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2012, and her B.A. in Anthropology from Cornell University in 2003.

Curriculum Vitae

UB Profile

Hanna Grol-Prokopczyk

Assistant Professor of Sociology, University at Buffalo, State University of New York.

Hanna Grol-Prokopczyk is medical sociologist and demographer. Much of her current research focuses on chronic pain: its measurement, its social distribution, and its consequences (including opioid use and mortality). She is the inaugural chair of an interdisciplinary research group devoted to understanding and addressing social disparities in pain (ADDAPT: Addressing Disparities in the Distribution and Assessment of Pain and its Treatments; an ACTTION working group). Grol-Prokopczyk also conducts methodological research on how surveys can best generate interpersonally and internationally comparable measures of subjective health conditions (including pain). Additional research interests include U.S. counterterrorism policy and the effects of celebrity culture on demographic trends.

Curriculum Vitae

CU Profile

Tara L. Gruenewald

Associate Professor & Chair, Department of Psychology, Crean College of Health and Behavioral Sciences, Chapman University.

Dr. Tara Gruenewald is a social and health psychologist with additional postdoctoral training in Public Health and Gerontology. Her research focuses on the social and psychological factors which shape cognitive and physical functioning, physiology, and mental and physical health across the life course. Current foci include: (1) Identification of the psychological, social, behavioral, and biological pathways which underlie socioeconomic gradients in functioning and health, (2) The role of perceptions of generativity in shaping health and functioning in later life, and (3) Examination of health correlates of generative activity and intergenerational civic activity engagement. Her research utilizes a wide array of designs including longitudinal cohort studies, experience sampling investigations, and experiments in the lab and in natural environments, as well as diverse data collection methods.

Curriculum Vitae

UNC Profile

Taylor W. Hargrove

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology & Faculty Fellow, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dr. Hargrove's primary areas of interest are race and ethnicity, aging and the life course, and the social stratification of health. Her program of research seeks to uncover the origins and development of health disparities across the life course and is guided by three overarching questions: To what extent do race, skin color, and other social statuses combine to shape health at different stages of life? How do pathways to health and aging differ among members of broadly defined social groups? What are the psychosocial mechanisms underlying health inequality?

Dr. Hargrove is currently engaged in research that explores the ways in which social, community, and neighborhood contexts influence biological measures of health and well-being in earlier portions of life. The goal of this work is to elucidate how macro-level environments shape linkages among race, skin color, gender, social class, and more proximate causes of poor health. Her research has been supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and her recent peer-reviewed publications appear in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Ethnicity & Disease, and the Journal of Family and Community Health.

Curriculum Vitae

UNC Profile

Kathleen Mullan Harris

Faculty Fellow, Carolina Population Center, James Haar Distinguished Professor of Sociology & Adjunct Professor of Public Policy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Kathie Mullan Harris is a social demographer whose research focuses on social inequality and health with particular interests in family demography, life course processes, sociogenomics, and health disparities. Harris is Director and Principal Investigator of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), a longitudinal study of more than 20 thousand teens who are being followed into adulthood. Under her leadership, the study has pioneered innovative study designs and integrative multidisciplinary research to understand social, environmental, behavioral, biological and genetic linkages in developmental and health trajectories from adolescence into adulthood. Harris has been an advocate within the social science and population disciplines for bridging social and biomedical sciences to advance knowledge on the development of health disparities from both an inter- and intra-generational perspective to inform public health and social policy. Her 100+ publications appear in a wide range of disciplinary journals including demography, genetics, family, epidemiology, biology, public policy, survey methodology, medicine, and social and health behavior. She received her doctorate in demography from the University of Pennsylvania. Harris was President of the Population Association of America in 2009 and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2014.

Curriculum Vitae

USC Profile

Personal Website

Jessica Y. Ho

Assistant Professor, Leonard Davis School of Gerontology and Department of Sociology, University of Southern California.

Dr. Ho’s research focuses on understanding the social processes shaping life expectancy, health, and well-being in the United States and in other countries. Her four main research areas examine: (1) causes and consequences of the contemporary American opioid epidemic, (2) contributors to the American life expectancy shortfall relative to other high-income countries, (3) racial/ethnic, socioeconomic, and gender disparities in health and mortality, and (4) social determinants of health over the life course and mortality in developing countries. Two of her current projects aim to understand the social and institutional processes leading to the development of the drug overdose epidemic, and to explore the broader social impacts of the opioid epidemic by tracing out some of its implications for family structure, living arrangements, and intergenerational relationships. She has been the recipient of a Career Development Award from the NICHD, a pilot grant from the University of Southern California’s Resource Center for Minority Aging Research, and a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. She has also contributed to and consulted for two National Academy of Sciences panels on international comparisons of American longevity.

Curriculum Vitae

Duke Profile

V. Joseph Hotz

Research Associate, Duke Population Research Institute, Arts & Sciences Professor of Economics, Duke University.

V. Joseph Hotz is the Arts and Sciences Professor of Economics at Duke University. Hotz earned his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has held faculty positions at Carnegie Mellon, University of Chicago, and UCLA. His areas of research include economics of the family, economic demography, labor economics, applied econometrics, and social program evaluation.

Hotz's primary areas of research are the economics of the family, labor economics and applied econometrics. His current research is focused on the family in promoting the health and well-being of across generations and the impacts of family-friendly workplaces on gender gaps in the careers of mothers and fathers.

Hotz is the Principal Investigator of the Add Health Parent Study (AHPS) funded by the National Institute on Aging (NIA). The AHPS is an Intergenerational study of the health and well-being of aging parents and their adult children who are members of the Add Health Study. These parents have been interviewed in 1995 and are being re-interviewed in 2015-2018. The study includes data on: Health & Health Behaviors; Cognition, Personality & Preferences; the Economic Capacities & Time Availabilities of each Generation; the Family Relationships & the Family Network that Promote Health & Well-Being. Hotz and colleagues are also investigating the extent and nature of kin interactions and time and money transfers among members of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) that also is funded by NIA.

Hotz is the past director of the Chicago Population Research Center and the incoming Chair of the Population Association of America's Committee on Population Statistics.

Hotz is a Fellow of the Econometric Society and past president of the Southern Economic Association.

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Website

Theodore Iwashyna

Associate Professor, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine in the Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan.

Theodore Iwashyna is a critical care physician and Medical School faculty member focusing on health services research. Dr. Iwashyna's research focuses on the long-term health impacts of acute disruptive events, blending both clinical and social science perspectives. His recent work has examined the extent to which acute illnesses cause disruptions in the lives of patients and their families, and how social, organizational, and family factors may moderate these adverse consequences. Methodologically, he combines the traditional tools of demographic and health services research with emerging techniques in network analysis and longitudinal data analysis. He has used the HRS data to address issues of late life health and health care utilization, especially the impact of major acute medical episodes on long-term trajectories of health in later life.

Curriculum Vitae

Brown Profile

Margot Jackson

Associate Professor, Department of Sociology, Brown University.

My research focuses on social stratification and social demography, with an emphasis on population health and inequality among children and families. My work to date examines the dynamic relationship between social circumstances and health over the life course and across generations. Much of my research has examined the early life cycle origins of inequality and the role of child health in the production of social inequality. For example, several papers apply cumulative inequality theory to examine how poor health in early childhood produces cumulative academic inequality and affects socioeconomic attainment in adulthood. Other work examines how early childhood health investments--specifically, U.S. childhood nutritional policy--play a role in reducing academic inequality. In a new project, I am examining the changing relationship among parental education, parenting practices and children's well-being across several decades in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Publications

UCLA Profile

Arun Karlamangla

Associate Professor-in-Residence, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles.

Arun Karlamangla is a geriatric physician scientist at UCLA, working on SES differences in multiple health outcomes. Dr. Karlamangla is a geriatrician who provides oupatient and inpatient primary and consultative care. He also conducts research on the prediction of physical and cognitive decline in older adults, determinants of successful aging, and the role of psychosocial stressors in the health of older adults. He teaches a two-quarter sequence on data analysis for clinical research.

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Website

Lisa A. Keister

Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Duke University.

Lisa A. Keister is Gilhuly Distinguished Professor of Sociology at Duke University. She is an economic sociologist who conducts research in two areas: wealth ownership and organizational networks. Her work on wealth ownership explores the factors that lead to household wealth accumulation and aggregate inequality. She has recently begun working on issues related to the association between household finances and health outcomes including work on how increasing wealth concentration is related to declining health in the U.S. Her work on organizations focuses on the role of inter- and intra-organizational networks and their effects. She is currently working on a project on physician networks and opioid prescriptions. She is author of numerous books including Wealth in America, Getting Rich, and Faith and Money: How Religious Belief Contributes to Wealth and Poverty. She is currently completing a book on America's wealthiest families, the one percent. More information on her work is available here.

Curriculum Vitae

USC Profile

Jung Ki Kum

Research Associate Professor, Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California.

Dr. Kim's research addresses how biological risks are related to sociodemographic, social and psychological factors as well as other health outcomes. Kim has been working with Dr. Crimmins and others on biomarkers in large national and local datasets including NHANES, HRS, IFLS, ELSA, SHARE, LASI, SEBAS, CRELES, CHARLS and MHAS. Kim had an NIA grant (R03AG040609 - 9/1/2011 - 7/31/2014) which studied the onset of biological risks in five countries - US (HRS), England (ELSA), Mexico (MxFLS), Indonesia (IFLS), and Taiwan (SEBAS). She has been analyzing how biological status varies by gender, education and race/ethnicity and what mechanisms are involved in its relationship. She has conducted a cross-country comparison in examining biological risks with all of these factors, and continues to be involved in this area of research.

Curriculum Vitae

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Kenneth M. Langa

Cyrus Sturgis Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School. Research Professor, Institute of Gerontology, Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research & Professor of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan.

Kenneth Langa is a physician and Ph.D. in Public Policy. He has made major contributions to understanding social determinants of disparities in health, especially cognitive impairment. Dr. Langa's present research focuses on estimating the societal costs of chronic disease for both working-age and older adults, with a special emphasis on Alzheimer's Disease. He is an Associate Director of the 'Health and Retirement Study,' a nationally representative longitudinal survey of adults age 51 and older, funded by the National Institute on Aging. Dr. Langa has been an investigator on the ACL study since 2011.

Curriculum Vitae

MSU Profile

Claire E. Margerison

Assistant Professor, College of Human Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University.

Claire Margerison is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics. She has an MPH and a PhD in epidemiology from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Margerison's research focuses on racial and socioeconomic disparities in women's health across the life-course and on assessing the influence of social and economic contexts and policies on health. Recent work includes research examining the influence of macroeconomic conditions—specifically the Great Recession—on pregnancy health and birth outcomes funded by the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and a pilot project to examine the effects of Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act on preconception health and pregnancy outcomes. She also has a Mentored Career Development (K01) award to examine how social, psychosocial, and biological factors during pregnancy contribute to racial disparities in women's cardiovascular health at mid-life.

Curriculum Vitae

UIC Profile

Uchechi A. Mitchell

Assistant Professor, Division of Community Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dr. Mitchell is a health disparities and minority aging scholar. Her research investigates racial health disparities and biopsychosocial pathways leading to poor health among older racial and ethnic minorities. Past work has focus on pathways explaining disparities in biological indicators of physiological functioning (e.g., inflammation, cardiometabolic risk); racial and ethnic differences in psychosocial outcomes; psychosocial predictors of poor health among older adults; and the health effects of experiences of discrimination and other sources of stress. Overall, Dr. Mitchell's research seeks to characterize racial health disparities among older adults and answer questions about: (1) how the accumulation of stressful exposures over the life course affects minority elders, (2) how differential exposure to stressors contributes to racial health disparities in older adulthood, and (3) how these processes differ by race/ethnicity, gender and other indicators of social status.

Curriculum Vitae

Syracuse Profile

Personal Website

Shannon M. Monnat

Associate Professor, Department of Sociology; Lerner Chair for Public Health Promotion; Co-Director, Policy, Place, and Population Health Lab, Aging Studies Institute; Senior Research Associate, Center for Policy Research; Syracuse University.

Dr. Monnat is a rural demographer, whose research falls at the intersection of place, public policy, and health. Her recent demographic and epidemiological studies use national county-level mortality, Census, policy, and other social data to understand spatial variation in opioid mortality and other “diseases and deaths of despair”. In other research, she uses surveys, network methods, and in-depth interviews to understand trajectories into opioid misuse and how substance misuse affects and is affected by social network composition. Much of her research is focused on rural people and places.

Curriculum Vitae

Syracuse Profile

Jennifer Karas Montez

Professor of Sociology, Gerald B. Cramer Faculty Scholar in Aging Studies, Co-Director of the Policy, Place, and Population Health Lab, and Faculty Associate in the Aging Studies Institute, Syracuse University.

Dr. Montez is a social demographer whose research examines disparities in health and longevity at the intersection of gender, education, and geography. Much of her research focuses on the large and growing inequalities in adult mortality across education levels and geographic areas within the United States. She is particularly interested in understanding why the growing inequalities have been most troublesome among women and southern US states. Her current work on this topic blends perspectives from sociology, demography, public health, and feminist geography to investigate how state policies shape women's and men's mortality in different ways. In another line of research she examines the enduring consequences of early-life experiences, such as childhood poverty, for adult health. She is especially interested in sex and gender differences in these how these processes unfold across the life course to shape health.

Curriculum Vitae

Duke Profile

James Moody

Robert O. Keohane Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Duke University.

James Moody is the Robert O. Keohane professor of sociology at Duke University. He has published extensively in the field of social networks, methods, and social theory with over 70 peer reviewed papers and extensive applied consultation with industry and DoD. His work has focused theoretically on the network foundations of social cohesion and diffusion, with a particular emphasis on building tools and methods for understanding dynamic social networks. He has used network models to help understand organizational performance, school racial segregation, adolescent health, disease spread, economic development, and the development of scientific disciplines (among others). Moody's work is funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the James S. McDonnel Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and has appeared in top social science, health and medical journals. He is winner of INSNA's (International Network for Social Network Analysis) Freeman Award for scholarly contributions to network analysis and in 2014 was named a Thomson Reuters “Highly Cited Researcher,” for authorship of papers in the top 1% of citations within the field. He is founding director of the Duke Network Analysis Center, former editor of the on-line Journal of Social Structure and co-founding editor of the American Sociological Association's new Open Access journal Socius.

Curriculum Vitae

MPIDR Profile

Mikko Myrskylä

Director, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (MPIDR); Professorial Research Fellow, London School of Economics; Professor of Social Statistics, University of Helsinki.

Mikko is a demographer and statistician with research interests in population health, fertility trends, and demographic forecasting. Current research foci include the impact of changing behavioral patterns and healthy and unhealthy life expectancy; methods for analyzing disability dynamics; health and demographic consequences of postponement of parenthood; and analysis of fertility patterns on a global scale.

Curriculum Vitae

JH Profile

Lauren Nicholas

Assistant Professor, Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins University. Off-Campus Research Affiliate, Population Studies Center, Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan.

Lauren Hersch Nicholas is a health economist whose research focuses on the role of public policy in improving health and healthcare quality for the elderly. Her current research combines survey, administrative, and clinical data to study the interaction between healthcare utilization and economic outcomes, with an emphasis on surgery, dementia, and end-of-life care. She is currently studying financial predictors and consequences of cognitive impairment and recently received an R01 from the National Institute on Aging to study advance care planning for dementia patients.

Curriculum Vitae

UNC Profile

Krista Perreira

Professor of Public Policy and Faculty Fellow of the Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Krista Perreira is a health economist who studies disparities in health, education, and economic well-being and inter-relationships between family, health and social policy. Focusing on children in immigrant families, her most recent work combines qualitative and quantitative methodologies to study migration from Latin America and the health and educational consequences of migration. Through her research, she aims to develop programs and policies to improve the well-being of immigrant families and their children.

Curriculum Vitae

UT Profile

Tetyana Pudrovska

Assistant Professor of Sociology and Faculty Research Associate of the Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin.

Tetyana is currently working on two projects. The "Women in Leadership: Linking Stress, Health, and Equality" (WILLSHE) project (http://willsheproject.org/) explores how higher-status occupations and leadership affect women's and men's health. She is launching a multi-site and multi-method collection of longitudinal survey data, biomarkers, daily stress diary data, and in-depth interviews to understand how the psychological and physical health costs and rewards of job authority differ between men and women. The "Texas Dyadic Diabetes Study" project focuses on dyadic strategies of diabetes management in white and Hispanic couples in which one partner has type 2 diabetes. The project includes in-depths interviews with patients and their partners, longitudinal survey data, daily diary data, and biomarkers of metabolic health risks.

Curriculum Vitae

Utah Profile

Megan M. Reynolds

Assistant Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, University of Utah.

Megan M. Reynolds is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Utah. She holds a PhD in sociology from Duke University. Dr. Reynolds research examines health and health inequalities in order to understand processes of stratification and their consequences. She is particularly interested in the role of policy, politics and power in influencing well-being and in how these factors operate for vulnerable segments of the population. Her most recent project unifies her cross-national work on political economy of health and her domestic work on health inequalities to examine how the generosity of US social safety net programs affects the health of individuals at various points of the life course. To enable this research, Dr. Reynolds has assembled a novel dataset of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and Unemployment Insurance benefit levels in each US state beginning in 1997. This research has been supported by a Mentored Career Development Award (KL2) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Curriculum Vitae

CU Profile

Fernando Riosmena

Associate Professor, Population Program and Departments of Geography and (by courtesy) Sociology; and faculty fellow, Latin American Studies Center, University of Colorado at Boulder.

Professor Riosmena's research looks at how demographic processes are associated with the spatial and social mobility, well-being, and development in Latin American societies and immigrant communities from said region in the United States. His main research areas are immigrant health throughout different stages of the migration process and the role of U.S. immigration policy and social, economic, and environmental conditions in sending communities on the migration dynamics between Latin America and the United States.

EPHE Profile

Publications

Jean-Marie Robine

Associate Professor, Population Program and Departments of Geography and (by courtesy) Sociology; and faculty fellow, Latin American Studies Center, University of Colorado at Boulder.

Prof Jean-Marie Robine is an Emeritus Research Professor at INSERM, the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research, within the CERMES3 Research group in Paris and the Unit 1198 in Montpellier where he heads the research team Biodemography of longevity and vitality. He is also an Emeritus Professor at the advanced school Ecole pratique des hautes études in Paris. He studies human longevity, with the aim of understanding the relations between health and longevity. In particular, he measures the impact that the increase in adult life durations may have on the health status of the elderly population. In his most recent work, he takes into accounting the climate changes.

Since its creation in 1989, he has been the coordinator of the International Network on Health Expectancy (REVES), which brings together more some 100 researchers worldwide. He is co-responsible for the development of the International Database on Longevity (IDL) in association with the Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research (Rostock) and INED (Paris). He is the project leader of the healthy longevity project granted by AXA Research Fund: the Five-Country Oldest Old Project (5-COOP). He is also advisor to the Director of INED, the French National Institute on Demographic Studies on longevity and ageing issues.

He was the project leader of the European Joint Action EHLEIS (2011-2014) which provided analysis of disability-free life expectancies in the European Union and part of the BRIDGE-Health project (2015-2017) which aimed to prepare the transition towards a sustainable and integrated EU health information system. He was one of the Directors of the French Research Consortium on ageing and longevity (GDR CNRS 3662, 2014-2017) which prepared the way for ILVV, the French Institut de la Longévité, des Vieillesses et du Vieillissement.

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Website

Issac Sasson

Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Tel Aviv University.

Isaac Sasson is a sociologist and demographer specializing in population health. His current research focuses on the changing locus of lifespan inequality in low-mortality countries and the decline in life expectancy among low-educated Americans. In addition to the empirical study of health inequalities, Dr. Sasson is interested in the philosophical and normative underpinnings of distributive justice--i.e., which health distributions are inequitable?

Publications

UCLA Profile

Teresa Seeman

Professor of Internal Medicine, Medical School. Research Professor, Institute of Gerontology, Research Professor, Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research & Professor of Health Management and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Michigan.

Dr. Seeman's research interests focus on the role of socio-cultural factors in health and aging with specific interest in understanding the biological pathways through which these factors influence health and aging. A major focus of her research relates to understanding how aspects of the social environment, particularly social ties, influence health and aging. Dr. Seeman was a member of the MacArthur Research Network on Successful Aging (1985-1995) and is currently a member of the MacArthur Research Network on Socio-economic Status and Health. She is also currently a consultant to the Behavioral and Social Research Program at the National Institute on Aging on issues relating to the integration of physiological parameters into more socio-behavioral models of health and aging. In collaboration with Drs. Bruce McEwen and Burton Singer, she has taken a lead in empirical research on the new concept of allostatic load.

Curriculum Vitae

UT Profile

Debra Umberson

Professor of Sociology, Director of the Population Research Center, and Centennial Commission Professor in the Liberal Arts #1 at the University of Texas at Austin.

Umberson's research focuses on social factors that influence population health with a particular emphasis on aging and life course change, marital and family ties, and gender and racial variation in health disparities. In her newest research, supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA R01AG054624), she focuses on racial/ethnic differences in exposure to the death of family members across the life course and the implications for long-term health and mortality disparities. Much of her recent research (supported by NIA and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) has examined how marital relationships affect health-related behavior and health care, and how those processes vary across gay, lesbian, and heterosexual unions. Dr. Umberson is an elected Fellow of the Gerontological Society of America, the 2015 recipient of the Matilda White Riley Distinguished Scholar Award from the American Sociological Association's Section on Aging and the Life Course and the 2016 recipient of the Leonard I. Pearlin Award for Distinguished Contributions to the Sociological Study of Mental Health from the American Sociological Association's Section on Mental Health. She is also a past editor of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Publications

UPenn Profile

Atheendar S. Venkataramani

Assistant Professor, Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Senior Fellow, Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

Atheendar Venkataramani is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy and a staff physician at the Penn Presbyterian Medical Center. Dr. Venkataramani is a health economist who studies the life-course origins of health and socioeconomic inequality. His current research focuses on elucidating the effects of early life interventions on adult health and well-being; understanding the relationship between economic opportunities and health behaviors and outcomes; and examining the spillover health impacts of social policies. This work spans both domestic and international settings and is currently funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Venkataramani completed his MD at Washington University, his PhD in Health Policy (Economics) and Yale University, and his BS in Biology and Economics at Duke University. He completed a residency in Internal Medicine - Global Primary Care at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Website

Lois M. Verbrugge

Research Affiliate, Population Studies Center. Research Professor Emerita, Center for Population Planning, School of Public Health. Research Professor Emerita and Senior Distinguished Research Scientist Emerita, Institute of Gerontology. University of Michigan.

Dr. Verbrugge is a social demographer who studies disability among midlife and older adults; how activities of older persons are affected by functional limitations; the twin issues of aging-with-disability and disability-with-aging; physical and social impacts of arthritis and other disabling conditions; and trends in activities and disability among midlife and older adults.

Curriculum Vitae

SC Profile

CHIP Website

Katrina M. Walsemann

Associate Professor and Undergraduate Director, Department of Health Promotion, Education, & Behavior, University of South Carolina. Director, Carolina Consortium on Health, Inequalities, and Populations (CHIP). Co-Lead, Analysis Core, Carolina Center on Alzheimer's Disease and Minority Research.

Dr. Walsemann is a population scientist whose research focuses on understanding how social inequities influence health and racial health disparities across the life course. She is particularly interested in how experiences within the education system and the family shape individuals' physical and mental health. Specific empirical studies have examined how parental SES, the school environment, and the accumulation of educational advantages during adolescence influence health behavior and health across the life course. Other projects have examined how marginalization (e.g., legal status, sexual minority status, race/ethnicity) impacts health and how student debt may negatively impact the psychosocial health of young adults.

Curriculum Vitae

UNC Profile

Yang Claire Yang

Professor, Department of Sociology, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Faculty Fellow, Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Dr. Yang is a biodemographer, medical sociologist, and social statistician interested in health, aging and quantitative methodology. She conducts transdisciplinary research that aims to explicate the life course process by which social forces and biological factors jointly contribute to health disparities and to uncover how it is that exposures and experiences "get under the skin" to manifest in health difference. Her general approaches are to integrate sociodemographic and biological theories and data, develop new statistical models and methods for analysis of time related change, and construct a multisystem explanatory framework for identifying pathogenic mechanisms of age related disease. She has published extensively on new statistical methodologies of cohort analysis and social differentials of health and aging across disciplines such as demography, epidemiology, gerontology, and sociology. Her recent and ongoing NIA-funded research pursues new avenues for studying the life course and aging using integrative data analysis and explicating biosocial linkages over the entire human life span.

Curriculum Vitae

Personal Website

Anna Zajacova

Associate Professor of Sociology, University of Western Ontario.

Anna Zajacova is a health demographer, sociologist, and social epidemiologist. Her research examines social determinants of health across the lifecourse in the United States. She has recently uncovered important anomalies in the generally strong positive correlation between educational attainment and health. Specifically, in recent birth cohorts, adults appear to have little returns to college education unless they earn a credential, especially a bachelor's degree. Another significant anomaly pertains to GED recipients whose health was long assumed to be equivalent to that of high school graduates. Zajacova and colleagues found, however, that GED is associated substantially worse health than among high school graduates; it is equivalent to health of high school dropouts instead. She is now collaborating with several colleagues to explain these anomalies. In a related emerging research agenda, Zajacova and colleagues have described worrisome trends in the disability and in chronic pain among Americans across the adult lifespan. She is now exploring whether the worsening socioeconomic conditions in recent decades, perhaps combined with the high obesity prevalence in the US population, could explain the observed trends.

Curriculum Vitae

TAMU Profile

Preeti Zanwar

Instructional Assistant Professor, Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University

Preeti Zanwar is a health economist, epidemiologist, and virologist. She is instructional Assistant Professor at Texas A&M University School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and an affiliate faculty at the Center for Population Health & Aging at the same school. She is recipient of NIA funded T32 Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award in Minority Aging at University of Texas Medical Branch, and scholarships for RAND Summer Institute in Aging at RAND Corporation, Santa Monica and Butler-William Scholar Program at NIA, Bethesda. Her early NIH funded research at Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, examined effects of microbial infections in human cancers and in solid-organ transplantation. Her doctoral research at UTHealth School of Public Health examined utilization and costs of overweight and obesity in adults with kidney disease using nationally representative Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data. Her post-doctoral research examined downstream costs of differences in ordering rates of prostate-specific antigen screening tests by primary care providers in males 75 years and older using 100% Texas Medicare data. Her recent projects have examined access to evidence-based clinical preventive services (1) in younger and older adults with physical and cognitive limitations and (2) in males vs females. She is currently investigating trends in comorbidities and disability type by race-ethnicity in the U.S. Her general areas of focus revolve around microbial and socioeconomic differences, chronic health disparities, technological use, disability (including cognitive) and aging related outcomes, in both domestic and global spheres. Her multidisciplinary research has been cited over 300 times and published in wide range of disciplinary journals, e.g. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, Disability and Health, Journal of Infectious Disease, Virology, and other avenues, such as Encyclopedia of Metagenomics, and ACM Proceedings of the workshop on Human-Habitat for Health Multimodal Interaction for Promoting Health and Well-Being in the Internet of Things Era.