Patricia Reuter-Lorenz
 

Ph.D., University of Toronto
Psychology

M.A., University of Toronto
Psychology

B.A., State University of New York, Purchase
Psychology

 

Patricia Reuter-Lorenz

Patricia Reuter-Lorenz is Professor in the Department of Psychology, in the Cognition and Cognitive Neuroscience Program at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she directs the Cognitive and Affective Neuropsychology Laboratory.  She is also a member of the Neuroscience Program, and the co-Director of the International Max Planck Research School in Life Span Development. Dr. Reuter-Lorenz’s research examines executive functions and memory across the lifespan using behavioral and brain imaging methodologies, with a special focus on how aging affects cognitive and emotional processes.  Her aging research has focused on age differences in the engagement of executive control processes, and the possible compensatory functions of prefrontal cortex with funding from the National Institute of Aging.

She is co-founder of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, and has played a leadership role in this organization since 1993. She has been a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the Max Planck Institute on Human Development since 2007 and on the National Scientific Advisory Council of the Association for Advancement of Aging Research since 2010. In addition to her membership on numerous editorial boards including Psychological Science and Psychology of Aging, she is currently Co-Editor-in-Chief of Aging, Neuropsychology & Cognition, and section editor for Neuropsychologia. In addition to publishing numerous peer-reviewed articles, she has edited two books Lifespan Development and the Brain: The Perspective of Biocultural Co-Constructivism (with Paul Baltes and Frank Rosler) and The Cognitive Neuroscience of Mind: A Tribute to Michael S. Gazzaniga (with Kathy Baynes, Ron Mangun, and Liz Phelps)She has received numerous awards for her research, mentorship and teaching, including the Outstanding Mentor Award from Division 20 of the American Psychological Association, and the Justine Sergent Prize for International Research in Cognitive Neuroscience.