Interdisciplinary Seminar in Quantitative Methods (ISQM)

The goal of the Interdisciplinary Seminar in Quantitative Methods is to provide an interdisciplinary environment where researchers can present and discuss cutting-edge research in quantitative methodology. The talks will be aimed at a broad audience, with more emphasis on conceptual than technical issues. The research presented will be varied, ranging from new methodological developments to applied empirical papers that use methodology in an innovative way. We welcome speakers and audiences from all fields in the social, natural, and behavioral sciences.

Organizers: Matias Cattaneo and Rocio Titiunik
To be added to the email list, please contact us at: isqm-subscribe@umich.edu.

Location: Eldersveld Room, 5670 Haven Hall

Time: Wednesdays, 4:00 - 5:30pm

Note: Please see event listing for particular changes in location or time.

Quantifying Complexity

September 10, 2014: Scott Page, Complex Systems, Political Science, and Economics, University of Michigan
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How do Climate Models Compare with Reality Over the Tropics from 1958-2012? HAC-Robust Trend Comparisons Among Climate Series with Possible Intercept Shifts

September 24, 2014: Timothy J. Vogelsang, Economics, Michigan State University
Note time change: Seminar will take place at 1pm
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Why Does the American National Election Study Overestimate Voter Turnout?

October 8, 2014: Simon Jackman, Political Science, Stanford University
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Estimating the Impacts of Program Benefits: Using Instrumental Variables with Underreported and Imputed Data

October 22, 2014: Mel Stephens, Economics, University of Michigan

Using Experiments to Estimate Geographic Variation in Racially Polarized Voting

November 5, 2014: Kevin M. Quinn, School of Law, University of California at Berkeley
Note location change: Seminar will take place in 201 Lorch Hall

Mitigating the Usual Limitations of the basic Regression-Discontinuity Design: Theory and Three Empirical Demonstrations from Design Experiment

November 19, 2014: Thomas D. Cook, Sociology, Psychology, and Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University
Note location change: Seminar will take place in 201 Lorch Hall

Statisticians (Social Science) and Data Scientists (Machine Learners): Let’s Talk

December 3, 2014: Neal Beck, Department of Politics, New York University

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February 11, 2015: Don Rubin, Statistics, Harvard University

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February 25, 2015: William G. Jacoby, Political Science, Michigan State University

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March 11, 2015: Tyler J. VanderWeele, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health

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March 25, 2015: Elizabeth A. Stuart, Mental Health and Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

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April 8, 2015: Judea Pearl, Computer Science Department and Cognitive Systems Lab, UCLA

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April 22, 2015: Dylan Small, Statistics, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania

An empirical model of network formation: detecting homophily when agents are heterogeneous

May 6, 2015: Bryan S. Graham, Economics, University of California at Berkeley