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Application & Financial Support Due date: February 27th, 2006

Overview

Design of Instruction

Previous EITM Institutes

 

Participant Bios

Guest Faculty Bios

Curriculum and Lead Faculty

I. Institutions and Institutional Analysis

II. Empirical Evaluation of Causality

III. Complexity: Diversity, Networks, Adaptation, and Emergence

IV. Additional Guest Lecturers and Student Presentations

 

Podcasting EITM 2006

Participant/Faculty Page

Contact: eitm@umich.edu

 

Empirical Implications of Theoretical Models
(19 June - 14 July, 2006)

Curriculum and Faculty

Overview of Curriculum for Summer 2006

WEEK ONE (June 19-June 23): Institutions and Institutional Analysis
John Aldrich (Duke University) and Arthur Lupia (University of Michigan)

WEEK TWO (June 26-June 30): Empirical Evaluation of Causality
James Granato (University of Texas, Austin) and Rebecca Morton (New York University)

WEEK THREE (July 3, July 5-July 8): Complexity: Diversity, Networks, Adaptation, and Emergence
Scott Page (University of Michigan)

WEEK FOUR (July 10-July 14): Additional Guests, Student Interactions and Presentations Walter R. Mebane (Cornell University) and Branislav Slantchev (University of California, San Diego)

 

Lead Faculty

WEEK ONE (June 19-June 23): Institutions and Institutional Analysis

John Aldrich (Duke University) and Arthur Lupia (University of Michigan)

John Aldrich is Pfizer-Pratt University Professor of Political Science at Duke University. He specializes in American politics and political behavior, formal theory, and methodology. Books he has authored or co-authored include Why Parties? The Origin and Transformation of Political Parties in America (1995), Linear Probability, Logit and Probit Models (1984), Before the Convention (1980), and a series of books on elections, the most recent of which is Change and Continuity in the 2004 Elections. His articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Journal of Politics, Public Choice, and other journals and edited volumes. He has received grants from the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and has served as co-editor of the American Journal of Political Science and as a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences and at the Rockefeller Center, Bellagio. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Current projects include studies of various aspects of campaigns and elections, political parties, the political effects of economic globalization, and Congress.

 

Arthur Lupia is Professor in the Department of Political Science and a Research Professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He examines how information and institutions affect policy and politics with a particular focus on how people make decisions when they lack information. His work provides insights on voting, civic competence, legislative-bureaucratic relations, parliamentary governance, and the role of the media and the Internet in politics. He is co-author of two books, The Democratic Dilemma: Can Citizens Learn What They Need to Know? (1998) and Stealing the Initiative: How State Government Reacts to Direct Democracy (2001), and co-editor of Elements of Reason: Cognition, Choice, and the Bounds of Rationality (2000). His articles appear in leading political science, economics, and law journals. He is the recipient of the 1998 Award for Initiatives in Research from the National Academy of Sciences. He spent academic year 1999-2000 as a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. In 2003, he was elected a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is Principal Investigator of two large interdisciplinary data collection projects, the American National Election Studies (since 2005) and Time-shared Experiments for the Social Sciences project (TESS, since 2001). Both are innovative NSF-sponsored program that allow scientists from many disciplines conduct innovative research on nationally-representative subject pools.

 

WEEK TWO (June 26-June 30): Empirical Evaluation of Causality
James Granato (University of Texas, Austin) and Rebecca Morton (New York University)

Jim Granato is currently at the Department of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. Before arriving to that department, Jim was a Visiting Scientist and Political Science Program Director in the Political Science Program of the National Science Foundation (NSF). His teaching and research interests include American politics, political economy (macro), econometrics (time series), and the unification of formal and empirical analysis (empirical implications of theoretical models (EITM)). He is the author or co-author of numerous publications in academic journals such as American Journal of Political Science, Economics and Politics, Journal of Theoretical Politics, Political Analysi, Political Research Quarterly, Public Choice, and the Southern Economic Journal. His recent book (April 2006) is entitled The Role of Policymakers in Business Cycle Fluctuations and has been published by Cambridge University Press.

 

Rebecca Morton is a Professor in the Wilf Family Department of Politics at New York University. Her substantive research has focused on the electoral process, with a particular emphasis on the effects of different electoral institutions on the choices of candidates and voters. Her book (coauthored with Kenneth Williams) Learning by Voting: Sequential Choices in Presidential Primaries and Other Elections (2001), addresses the effects of voting sequentially (as in presidential primaries in the United States or in elections with substantial mail-in and absentee voting) on the choices voters make and the candidates who win. Her new book, Analyzing Elections (2006), is a comprehensive study of the American electoral process. Methodologically, Morton has considered the complexity of empirical evaluation of formal models in the discipline of political science in her book, Methods and Models: A Guide to the Empirical Analysis of Formal Models in Political Science (1999). More recently, she has focused on the role played by experimental research in addressing causal questions in political science in a manuscript coauthored with Kenneth Williams, From Nature to the Lab: Experimental Political Science and the Study of Causality. Both her methodological and substantive research have appeared in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Law and Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Economics and Politics, and Social Choice and Welfare.

 

WEEK THREE (July 3, July 5-July 8): Complexity: Diversity, Networks, Adaptation, and Emergence

Scott Page (University of Michigan)

Scott Page is a full professor of complex systems, political science, and economics at the University of Michigan as well the associate director of the Center for the Study of Complex Systems ( www.cscs.umich.edu ), a senior research scientist at the Institute for Social Research, and director of the NSF IGERT IDEAS Program.  He has published papers in leading journals in the fields of complex systems, economics, and political science. He is currently finishing two books that are due out in 2006. The first is coauthored with John Miller on complex adaptive social systems.  The second is about the logic of diversity. Scott studies complex adaptive social systems with particular interests in the implications of diversity and complexity on institutional performance and design. Scott's current projects include research on diverse problem solvers, cultural diversity, path dependence, chain stores, public policy formation, public good provision, and mental model aggregation. He is a principal investigator on several research projects including an NSF IGERT Grant, an NSF bio-complexity grant, a McDonnell Foundation research grant an Air Force MURI grant and an NSF human and social dynamics grant.